Notes


Note    N00589         Index
John G. Cardwell - born about 1783 in Virginia. He was the son of Thomas Cardwell and Mary LNU of Granville County, North Carolina. He is listed a minor (under 21 years of age at the time of his fathers death in 1799) in the 1805 North Carolina Supreme Court Case “Cardwell heirs vs. Brodie”. John moved from Granville County, North Carolina to Smith County, Tennessee by 15 October 1807. He is mentioned in the Smith County, Tennessee Court of Pleas and Quarter on that date at the estate sale of Matthew Harper on that date. John G. Cardwell married Sarah H. Robinson in about 1808 in Smith County, Tennessee. There is no known record of that marriage, but it is based on the birth year of their oldest child. Sarah H. Robinson Cardwell was born about 1790 in Virginia and was the daughter of William Robinson and Frances Winfree. She is mentioned in William Robinson’s Will dated 02 March 1826 in Smith County, Tennessee. John G. Cardwell is listed in the 1830 Smith County, Tennessee census. He is living near his brothers, Anderson Cardwell and Leonard Cardwell.

1830 Smith County, Tennessee census, page 33

John G. Cardwell - born between 1780 and 1790

*
Female (Sarah H.) - born between 1790 and 1800
*
Female (Chilnicy - 1809) - born between 1800 and 1810
*
Male (Thomas D.) - born between 1810 and 1815
*
Female (Frances - 1815) - born between 1815 and 1820
*
Female (Emily) - born between 1815 and 1820
*
Female (Polly Ann - 1818) - born between 1815 and 1820
*
Male (John R. - 1824) - born between 1820 and 1825
*
Female (Aletha - 1821) - born between 1820 and 1825
*
Female (undetermined - not listed in will) - born between 1820 and 1825
*
Male (William W. - 1825) - born between 1825 and 1830
*
Male (James Alexander - 1827) - born between 1825 and 1830
*
Female (Levicy - 1830) - born between 1825 and 1830

John is also listed in the 1840 Smith County, Tennessee census. He is living near his brother, Anderson Cardwell, and two of his nephews, Thomas and Varnel Cardwell - sons of his brother Thomas Cardwell, Jr.

1840 Smith County, Tennessee census, page 229

John G. Cardwell - born between 1780 and 1790.

*
Female (Sarah H. - ) - born between 1790 and 1800
*
Female (Polly Ann - 1818) - born between 1810 and 1820
*
Male (John R. - 1824) - born between 1820 and 1825
*
Female (Levicy - 1830) - born between 1825 and 1830
*
Male (William W. - 1825) - born between 1825 and 1830
*
Male (James Alexander - 1827) - born between 1825 and 1830
*
Female (Martha Paralee - 1834) - born between 1830 and 1835

John G. Cardwell died in Smith County, Tennessee. His Will, dated 01 February 1843, was probated in March of that year.

The Will of John G. Cardwell - Smith County, Tennessee - Will Book III - Abstract

John G. Cardwell - 01 February 1843 - Wife, Sally H.; Sons - William W. Cardwell; James Alexander Cardwell; Thomas D. Cardwell, deceased, and his two children; Daughters: Emily Watson Overstreet, deceased, wife of Thomas Overstreet, and their heirs. Grandson, John L.M. Cardwell, blind son of my daughter, Fanny H. Cardwell, wife of Varnel L. Cardwell. Children: Chilnicy Wheeler, Polly Ann Kemp, Lethy D. Kemp, Sally Cardwell, John R. Cardwell, Levicy N.M. Cardwell, Martha Cardwell. Witnesses: Allen (sic) D. Cardwell, Leonard Cardwell, William Robinson. Ex. Leonard H. Cardwell. Probated in March 1843.

The children of John G. Cardwell and Sarah H. Robinson will be constructed utilizing the Will, census records, and various court documents from Smith County, Tennessee.

Sarah is listed as head of household in the 1850 Smith County, Tennessee census. Click here for abstract. She was born about 1790 in Virginia according to the 1850 Smith County, Tennessee census. She is also listed in the 1860 Smith County, Tennessee census with her daughter, Levicy Cardwell Sampson, and family living with her. Sarah died in September 1860 in Smith County, Tennessee.

Notes


Note    N00590         Index
NANCY G. BRADLEY w/o Samuel Bradley, esq.; d/o Thomas and Mary Cardwell; born Granville Co., N.C., May 24, 1797; moved to Sumner Co., Tenn. 1807; md 1811; died Macon Co., Tenn., June 24, 1856; cancer.

SOURCE: The Christian Advocate, Nashville, Davidson County, TN - 12 Mar 1857

Notes


Note    N00595         Index
Biography by Earl D. Goldsmith, http://doughboysearcher.weebly.com/index.html

ERNEST MOORE ("DICK") VIQUESNEY
August 5th, 1876 - October 4, 1946

SCULPTOR OF "THE SPIRIT OF THE AMERICAN DOUGHBOY"
E. M. Viquesney’s grandfather was Charles A. Viquesney, a Paris-born (1802) carver who came to the United States in 1842. (E. M. Viquesney was once quoted as saying his grandfather came to the U. S. to do intricate carving on the U. S. Capitol Building, but according to Viquesney family member Cathie Schoppenhorst of Marthasville, Missouri, no independent documentation of that has been found.) When Charles Viquesney returned to France in the 1850s or '60s, two of his five sons remained permanently in the U. S. One of those was Alfred Paul Viquesney, who settled in the part of Virginia that became West Virginia during the Civil War. Alfred Paul moved to Indiana in the late 1860s, finally settling in Spencer, Indiana around 1874 and setting up a stonecarving and monuments business, where his son, Ernest Moore Viquesney, learned the trade early on.

Ernest Moore Viquesney, the only child of Alfred Paul and Jane [Lehman] Viquesney, was born in Spencer August 5, 1876, and lived there most of his life. He was called "Dick," even though that isn’t a nickname for either given name (that riddle is solved; see "Dick" and "Betty" section, below). He learned sculpting, engraving and carving from his father, and was also a portrait artist in his youth. When he died in 1946, some Spencer families still had crayon portraits he had created in his youth. It’s been said that he sometimes gave small plaster sculptures to neighbor children who broke them into pieces to use as chalk to mark up the sidewalks.

Viquesney served in the Spanish American War and was stationed at Pensacola, Florida at least part of that time. Later, he was commander of the Spencer Spanish American War Veterans post on more than one occasion, and held that position at the time of his death. Dick Viquesney married Cora Barnes in 1904, and during the 17 years from 1905 until early 1922, 14 were spent living and working in Americus, Georgia. The Viquesneys also lived briefly in other places such as Atlanta and Canton, Georgia, Shelbyville, Indiana and Peoria, Illinois during those years. After they left Americus in 1922, they lived very briefly in Hackensack, New Jersey before permanently returning to Spencer.

Viquesney was employed in Americus by, among others, Clark’s Monument Works and Schneider’s Marble Company, and was involved in the design/construction of monuments placed in the nearby National Cemetery at the Andersonville Civil War Prison site. It's been suggested that he knew Gutzon Borglum and speculated, but not verified, that he worked with him in some capacity related to Borglum's Stone Mountain Confederate Memorial sculptures, which as completed near Atlanta in the 1970s, are larger than those on Mount Rushmore. Viquesney created his most known work, "Spirit of The American Doughboy," in 1920 in Americus by the dedication of time, study and effort that began with sketches made in 1918. During his lifetime, he also made several other monuments and sculptures both life-size and in miniature.

After his final return to Spencer in early 1922, Viquesney continued to be involved in sculpting and other business pursuits. Those included the construction of an office building and the Tivoli theater, with an unusually large pipe organ, in Spencer. He lost the theater due to financial difficulties, and his office burned down. Despite these setbacks, he still managed to achieve moderate financial success over the span of his career. With respect to the Tivoli, Viquesney undoubtedly knew of Copenhagen's Tivoli Gardens, but humorously told people in Spencer that "TIVOLI" stood for "This Is Viquesney's Own Little Idea". After suffering a fire in 1985, reopening, and then falling into disrepair, the Tivoli was finally closed in 1999. It is still a Spencer landmark and is on the endangered list of the Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana.

In about 1925, Viquesney formed the Beaver Club of Spencer, which, by its constitution and by-laws, was to be Beaver Dam No. 1 chartered by the National Beaver Dam of the U.S.A. A photograph taken at the club’s 1931 Christmas party and more information is included on the Spencer, Indiana pages. It isn’t known whether any other local Beaver clubs were formed. There is a report that Viquesney once bought a load of monkey skins to have a coat made for Cora, indicating he had a sense of humor. It’s hoped that Cora did, too. On October 2, 1933, Cora contracted what at first appeared to be a bad cold, but which doctors later diagnosed as diphtheria. It gradually closed her throat until her breathing stopped and she died early the following morning, Tuesday, October 3.

Viquesney then married Betty Sadler, an accomplished organist, in 1936. They had ten happy years together, and drove to Bloomington, Indiana almost nightly for three years during World War II so Betty could entertain servicemen at the United Service Organization (USO). Betty died in August 1946, and Viquesney told several Spencer friends he was about to break from the loss. While his writings indicate he had deep religious convictions, he became despondent over Betty’s death, his own failing health, and the fact that, except for his half-brother Bert, he was the only one left from his line. As a result, he took his own life by asphyxiation in his car in his garage October 4, 1946, one day after the thirteenth anniversary of Cora’s death. He left a note saying he just could not go on, plans for his funeral, his will, and a lengthy obituary. He concluded the obituary with "So closes the book, the story ends. Dick rests with those he loved……his father and mother, Cora, Dick and Betty all lie now with Dick’s beautiful statue, 'The Unveiling', looking down on their graves where they sleep..." Viquesney had no children, so there are no descendents.